Growing Foods
in Bedfordshire

 

 

 

Growing Foods
in Bedfordshire

When you get introduced to the macrobiotic life, you discover multiple ways of practicing it. You can eat organic, seasonal and local, with animal products or without. But by now you must surely know that there is more to concern us and that our food and personal health isn’t everything. There’s always more to it, and at different levels, isn’t there? We now need to find ways to live that support the environment and that at the same time work for us within our own means and economies. Some of you must have started using less plastic or using more natural resources, you’ve maybe begun retaining rainwater in your garden for watering the plants or doing your own compost at home. And maybe you are at a point where you’re curious enough to start being involved in the process of producing your own veggies. 

Well, that’s my mission today: To encourage you to take that step forward without ever looking back! 

 

Swiss chard

I was born in a small village in the Czech republic and growing up I was always involved in the process of producing our family’s vegetables. At the time, I didn’t realize how much work one has to put into growing them, from the seed to the dinner table. Studying agricultural ecology thirty years ago meant learning mostly about the erosion of the soil and its link to its surroundings. Later, knowing macrobiotics, and cultivating for 20 years in Mallorca, I could understand more about it and I could study agronomic ecology from a new perspective. Here I discovered there is a relationship between the microbiome of our gut and our health as much as there is a relationship between a healthy soil and the health of the plants and animals that inhabit it. 

Since I came to the UK some years ago, I realised cultivating veggies is not only about having something organic to eat, to be more in contact with nature or to know what I am eating but, most importantly, to have autonomy and control over my source of food, something we’ve lost a long time ago. Our ancestors had this sovereignty over their food and they knew about the changing seasons, the weather patterns, the importance of the moon cycles, the right time to sow and harvest – all things that we have mostly lost touch with nowadays.